art random

littlelimpstiff14u2:

 The Ghostly Sculptures of Bruno Walpoth

Ghostly sculptures of Bruno Walpoth. Life-size, his powdered beauties, as if in opposition to their ghostly stature, seem heavy and grounded, their gazes locking whomever sees them into a spiritual arrest.

Working with traditional sculptural methods, Walpoth’s work is almost alchemical in quality.  Muscles, eyes and fingers that have been carved into wood (lime and walnut) or covered with lead leaf foils, seem soft and supple, sad and pensive. Idealistically beautiful, his figures show signs of bones and sinew under fragile skin.

Marks from carving tools show on the surface of the wooden bodies, and serve as quiet reminders that these creatures are not human. The marks break what anthropomorphizing has taken place and the observer is introduced to (or reminded of) the artist.  In a strange way, that break makes these works even more fascinating; they make clearly visible the love that has been passed from the creator to the created.

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself a child (Pinocchio) out of a piece of wood to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.  Ms. Gadaldi also states that “[they] seem to be immersed in a moment of intimate meditation. Their detached attitude and dreamy expression are characteristic for the stage of life they are going through: one of slow but inexorable physical and psychological development. As they evolve from children to adolescents and from adolescents to young adults, the first traces of self-consciousness and emotional involvement appear on their often still infantile faces.”

http://www.walpoth.com/wood.html

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

(via hifructosemag)

framenoir:

Yoshimoto Nara at Blum&Poe Gallery

Patti Smith talks to Simon Schama - FT.com

One of punk’s greatest, earliest voices reflects on her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe, a creativity nurtured from childhood and why, despite a string of personal tragedies, she is still an optimist

(Source: ft.com)

art-history:



Robert MapplethorpeAmerican, 1946-1989

Calla Lily, 1988 

Platinum print
18¾ × 19 in. (47.8 × 48.3 cm)
Edition no. 2/5

Whitney Museum of American Art
New York, New York, USA

© The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation Inc.

art-history:

Robert Mapplethorpe
American, 1946-1989

Calla Lily, 1988

Platinum print
18¾ × 19 in. (47.8 × 48.3 cm)
Edition no. 2/5

Whitney Museum of American Art
New York, New York, USA

© The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation Inc.

ummaannex:

It’s incredible to think that Keith Haring was only alive for 31 years, given the impact of his work. In New York particularly, his public pop-art greeted many thousands of people every day, and internationally he was, and still is, highly regarded. He also left behind a valuable legacy that includes, alongside his artwork, the Keith Haring Foundation; launched in 1989 “to assist AIDS-related and children’s charities”, said disease being the cause of his death just a year later.Above is a brief letter of advice he wrote to an aspiring artist and fan of his work, circa-1987.

ummaannex:

It’s incredible to think that Keith Haring was only alive for 31 years, given the impact of his work. In New York particularly, his public pop-art greeted many thousands of people every day, and internationally he was, and still is, highly regarded. He also left behind a valuable legacy that includes, alongside his artwork, the Keith Haring Foundation; launched in 1989 “to assist AIDS-related and children’s charities”, said disease being the cause of his death just a year later.

Above is a brief letter of advice he wrote to an aspiring artist and fan of his work, circa-1987.

arpeggia:

Nam June Paik - TV Cello, 1971, video tubes, TV chassis, plexiglass boxes, electronics, wiring, wood base, fan, stool, photograph, dimensions variable

"Since the early 1960s, Nam June Paik has explored the potential of television as an art object and an expressive medium. TV Cello is one of several objects Paik designed to be used by the late avant-garde cellist Charlotte Moorman (1933-1991). The three televisions in this work originally displayed three images: a direct feed of the immediate performance, a video collage of other cellists, and an intercepted broadcast television feed. As Moorman played this one-stringed cello with a regulation bow, she also created a series of electronic sounds, transforming the television into a musical instrument. When TV Cello was acquired by the Walker Art Center in 1992, Paik created new video images for the piece by combining existing footage of Moorman with excerpts from his video work Global Groove (1973)." [Walker Art Center]

See more Nam June Paik posts here.