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asylum-art:

Alexa Meade :  People Transformed Into Paintings

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What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.

“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.


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(via hifructosemag)

artnet:

"I went into photography because it seemed like the perfect vehicle for commenting on the madness of today’s existence." - Robert Mapplethorpe
Blue Rose is a quintessential example of Robert Mapplethorpe’s exquisite flower studies. 

artnet:

"I went into photography because it seemed like the perfect vehicle for commenting on the madness of today’s existence." - Robert Mapplethorpe

Blue Rose is a quintessential example of Robert Mapplethorpe’s exquisite flower studies. 

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Beautifully Oxidized Bronze Sculptures of Elongated Women

Michael James Talbot

London-based artist Michael James Talbot creates beautiful sculptures of elongated women inspired by Greek mythology and Venetian masquerades. The surreal representations merge the human form with abstract and exaggerated shapes, most often presenting a visual extension of the female’s garment. Altogether the sculptures stand tall, some even reaching heights greater than 6 feet tall.

The sculptor manages to seamlessly integrate the dramatic stretch of the bottom half of each figure in an unobtrusive way. Sometimes the woman’s foot will peek out, high above the granite base, though often the illusion of the draping material elegantly runs straight down to the bottom. The elaborate length seems to complement the figurative structures.

Talbot creates his captivating pieces by molding clay and casting each sculpture in bronze. He then proceeds to finish with chemical patination, adding a new sense of character to the already expressive figures. The artist says, “The human form gives me an endless source of inspiration. The subtlest of movements and expressions can be captured in the sculpture to portray a myriad of emotions and convey tension, drama, fluidity and grace. No other subject has this richness of emotional and spiritual content or the capacity to convey such a broad and interesting narrative.”

(via hifructosemag)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

 The Ghostly Sculptures of Bruno Walpoth

Ghostly sculptures of Bruno Walpoth. Life-size, his powdered beauties, as if in opposition to their ghostly stature, seem heavy and grounded, their gazes locking whomever sees them into a spiritual arrest.

Working with traditional sculptural methods, Walpoth’s work is almost alchemical in quality.  Muscles, eyes and fingers that have been carved into wood (lime and walnut) or covered with lead leaf foils, seem soft and supple, sad and pensive. Idealistically beautiful, his figures show signs of bones and sinew under fragile skin.

Marks from carving tools show on the surface of the wooden bodies, and serve as quiet reminders that these creatures are not human. The marks break what anthropomorphizing has taken place and the observer is introduced to (or reminded of) the artist.  In a strange way, that break makes these works even more fascinating; they make clearly visible the love that has been passed from the creator to the created.

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself a child (Pinocchio) out of a piece of wood to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.  Ms. Gadaldi also states that “[they] seem to be immersed in a moment of intimate meditation. Their detached attitude and dreamy expression are characteristic for the stage of life they are going through: one of slow but inexorable physical and psychological development. As they evolve from children to adolescents and from adolescents to young adults, the first traces of self-consciousness and emotional involvement appear on their often still infantile faces.”

http://www.walpoth.com/wood.html

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

(via hifructosemag)